Argument Essay Rikki-Tikki-Tavi Audio

Product Description

This Rikki Tikki Tavi by Rudyard Kipling Argumentative Writing Lesson focuses on Text Dependent Analysis and using Text Evidence as Support to develop a Constructed Response / Essay. The lesson comes complete with a Brainstorming section, a Thesis Statement development component, and an Argumentative Writing Tutorial.

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NO PREP – PRINT AND GO LESSONS FOR TEACHERS!!!!!

INTERACTIVE SLIDES FOR STUDENTS!!!

A great way to learn and teach writing Argumentative / Argument Essays for everyone!!! !!!

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Do your students have trouble writing essays in response to literature? Are you looking for a thorough way to incorporate both standards based and 6 Traits writing in your classroom routine? Here is EVERYTHING you need to start help your students write Literature Based Essays TODAY!

SMARTBoard users will find interactive slides, while PowerPoint users can project the slides onto a regular white board and have the students use regular dry erase pens for brainstorming and thesis statement development.

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This is an Argumentative Essay Prompt

“Literature Based Writing Prompt – Rikki Tikki Tavi” - In the short story “Rikki Tikki Tavi” by Rudyard Kipling, Rikki kills three snakes and destroys several snake eggs before they can hatch. Although he does this to protect the inhabitants of the garden, he has still taken lives.
Think about why Rikki Tikki Tavi was justified in his actions. Write to present your opinion as to why he was justified using evidence from the text as support.

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This Rikki Tikki Tavi Argumentative / Argument Writing Prompt lesson comes complete with:

Rikki Tikki Tavi Lesson Plan which includes:

• Common Core State Standards Indicated on Lesson Plan
• Instructional Focus
• Instructional Procedures
• Objectives/Goals
• Direct Instruction
• Guided Practice
• Enrichment
• Differentiation
• ESE Strategies
• ELL Strategies
• I Can Statement
• Essential Question

Rikki Tikki Tavi Student Worksheet includes:

• Prompt
• Rubric
• Brainstorming Section
• Thesis Statement Development
• How to Write an Argumentative Essay Tutorial

Rikki Tikki Tavi Presentation includes:

• Introduction slide with prompt (interactive for students to identify key vocabulary)
• Brainstorming slide (interactive for students to list ideas)
• Standard and Implied Thesis Development Slides
• How to Write an Argumentative Essay Tutorial
• Checklist slide

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The lessons in the Middle School Text Dependent Analysis Writing Prompts Unit include:

Link- Text Dependent Analysis – A Christmas Carol
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – All I Really Need to Know, I Learned in Kindergarten
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – All Summer in a Day
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Ant and the Grasshopper
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – After Twenty Years
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Amigo Brothers
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Annabel Lee
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Bud, Not Buddy
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Casey at the Bat
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Charles
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Chenoo
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Circuit
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Dog of Pompeii
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Duffy’s Jacket
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Eleven
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Fire and Ice
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Flowers for Algernon
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Ghost of the Lagoon
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Gift of the Magi
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Harlem Renaissance
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Harlem Night Song
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Harriet Tubman: Conductor on the Underground Railroad
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Hatchet
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Holes
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Horse Snake
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – I Like to See It Lap the Miles
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Jabberwocky
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Jacket
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Jeremiah’s Song
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Life Doesn’t Frighten Me
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Lob’s Girl
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Maniac Magee
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Matthew Henson at the Top of the World
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Medicine Bag
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Miss Awful
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Mother to Son
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Names / Nombres
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – No Thought of Reward
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – On Turning Ten
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Outsiders
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Paul Revere’s Ride
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Phantom Tollbooth
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Prince and the Pauper
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Problem with Bullies
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Red Guards from Red Scarf Girl
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Raymond’s Run
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Rikki Tikki Tavi
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Rules of the Game
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Seventh Grade Prompt 1
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Seventh Grade Prompt 2
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The School Play
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Should Wild Animals Be Kept as Pets?
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Sootface
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Space Settlements
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Still I Rise
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Story of My Life
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Tell Tale Heart
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Thank You, M’am
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Broken Chain
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Diary of Anne Frank
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Difference a City Year Makes
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Dinner Party
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Fun They Had
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Giver
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Landlady
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Monkey’s Paw
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street Prompt 1
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street Prompt 2
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Most Dangerous Game
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Open Window
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Ransom of Red Chief
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Richer, the Poorer
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Sound of Thunder
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Third Wish
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Treasure of Lemon Brown
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – The Zoo
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Three Skeleton Key
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Tuck Everlasting
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Tuesday of the Other June
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – To Build a Fire
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Woodsong
Link- Text Dependent Analysis – Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story

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BUY THE TEXT DEPENDENT ANALYSIS WRITING PROMPTS FULL Unit (83 Complete Lessons listed above) FOR ONLY $35!!!!

Link- TEXT DEPENDENT ANALYSIS WRITING PROMPTS!!!!! 83 LESSONS!!! Middle School

This bundle download has 83 lessons, will save you over 85%, and will give you everything you need for having your students write thorough and complete Text Dependent Analysis Essays and Constructed Responses. You won't have to develop a single Text Evidence Writing prompt or create a single PowerPoint or lesson plan yourself!

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Total Pages

16 Slides (PowerPoint Presentation), Lesson Plan 3 pages, Student Worksheet 4

‘‘Rikki-Tikki-Tavi,’’ Rudyard Kipling’s famous children’s story about the battle between a mongoose and two cobras, seems to be a straightforward tale in which the hero and villains are clearly defined and good triumphs over evil. However, like most stories that deal with such themes, the methods by which good and evil are defined and represented can serve to make a greater ideological point. Kipling, who wrote during the height of British imperial power, was a well-known proponent of British imperialism, and his ideologies were not absent from his children’s stories. In the case of ‘‘Rikki- Tikki-Tavi,’’ Kipling uses the cobras, Nag and Nagaina, as a symbol of evil in order to demonize the Hindu culture and thereby promote the British agenda of rule over India.

When Nag is first introduced, he is described in simple adjectives that serve to clearly attribute an evil nature to him:

. . . from the thick grass at the foot of the bush there came a low hiss—a horrid cold sound that made Rikki-tikki jump back two clear feet. Then inch by inch out of the grass rose up the head and spread hood of Nag, the big black cobra. . . . and he looked at Rikki-tikki with the wicked snake’s eyes that never change their expression. . . .

Both objective and subjective adjectives are used to describe him: while an adjective like ‘‘black’’ reflects an objective observation, other adjectives, such as ‘‘horrid’’ ‘‘cold,’’ and ‘‘wicked’’ that do the most to cast Nag as evil, are descriptions based not on fact but on the narrator’s subjective bias.

Aside from these subjective descriptions, however, there is little else to indicate why Nag—and by extension, his wife Nagaina—merit the attribution of evil.

The concept of evil itself is, of course, also subjective. It is commonly applied to that which falls outside of the bounds of the laws and morals that govern a particular society. It might be construed that the snakes are evil because they kill—but killing, in the world of the bungalow garden, is not an act that deviates from its laws. The only governing law is the law of survival, by which all the characters, snakes included, are primarily motivated.

The big man who lives in the bungalow does not hesitate to keep a mongoose to kill snakes or to use his shotgun against the snakes as well (as he does twice in the story) in order to protect himself and his family from death. At the same time, Nag and Nagaina would not hesitate to kill the humans in order to preserve their lives and the lives of their children: That survival is their sole motivation in attacking the humans and Rikki-tikki-tavi is evident when Nagaina explains the rationale of their ambush to Nag: ‘‘When the house is emptied of people . . . [Rikki-tikki-tavi] will have to go away, and then the garden will be our own again. . . . So long as the bungalow is empty, we are king and queen of the garden; and remember that as soon as our eggs in the melon-bed hatch . . . our children will need room and quiet.’’

Not only is killing for survival regarded as acceptable behavior, it is exalted as heroic. Rikkitikki- tavi is deemed a hero for bringing about the death of Nag and Nagaina. He even resorts to what would otherwise be considered less-than-scrupulous means to achieve his triumph when he fatally attacks a sleeping Nag. In fact, the only character who expresses any reluctance at killing—Darzee the tailorbird, who refuses to help Rikki destroy the cobras’ eggs—is called ‘‘a feather-brained little fellow’’ for not understanding that the act of taking life is vital to his own self-preservation.

The narrator’s choice of adjectives in describing the snakes, then, is not justified by any evidence of deviant behavior. The perception of the snakes as evil, therefore, is based solely on the snakes’ adversarial relationship to Rikki-tikki-tavi and especially to the human family.

Indeed, the narrative voice’s bias towards the human family’s point of view not only casts the snakes as evil, but it idealizes and, therefore, depicts as good the human family. Rikki-tikki considers himself to be a lucky mongoose for having been taken in by a human family because ‘‘every wellbrought- up mongoose always hopes to be a house mongoose.’’ The narrative goes further than simply idealizing all of humanity, however, in specifying that ‘‘Rikki-tikki’s mother . . . had carefully told Rikki what to do if ever he...

(The entire section is 1864 words.)

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