High School Principal Cover Letter Example

Principal Cover Letter

Principals coordinate daily operations in a school. These professionals have multiple roles, including administration and collaborating with state education officials. Common work activities seen on a Principal resume are setting academic goals, implementing school curricula, allocating budgets, monitoring expenses, organizing and attending school events, meeting with parents, coordinating and recruiting staff, and managing school records. A good Principal should also update their professional knowledge regularly by taking part in educational opportunities.

A successful cover letter sample for Principal usually highlights the following skills:

  • Education administration expertise
  • Managerial skills
  • Leadership
  • Strong communication and interpersonal skills
  • Computer competences
  • Decision-making
  • Time management and deadline orientation
  • Teamwork

Comparable Principal qualifications are visible in the cover letter example provided below.

For help with your resume, check out our extensive Principal Resume Samples.

Dear Mr. Meridian:

Upon learning of your opening for the position of Principal of Valley Hill, I felt compelled to submit my resume for your review. As an accomplished, visionary leader in the school sector with 18 years of operational, planning, and administration experience within the Mainline School System, I am well prepared to significantly contribute to your goals and objectives in this role.

My expertise lies in overseeing areas such as day-to-day operations, curriculum development, community partnership building, and standard setting for both students and staff to realize improved academic performance. From conceptualizing and establishing forward-thinking plans to collaborating with teachers and administrators to achieve consensus across multiple levels, I excel at directing strategic enhancements to drive goal achievement while communicating openly with instructors, staff, and parents.

Highlights of my experience include the following:

  • Advancing through increasingly responsible positions, starting from my early career as a middle school science teacher and progressing into first a Vice Principal and then a Principal role with Mainline Middle School in 2003.
  • Developing and implementing budgets, policies, and procedures while supervising a staff of 107 and a student population of approximately 800 while creating short- and long-range strategic plans to drive future physical and academic growth of the school.
  • Established a high-performing school as the primary vision and objective, setting and prioritizing goals and define time frames for professional staff development.
  • Instituted a weekly engagement program to amplify student exposure to varied extracurricular activities such as dancing, culinary arts, and outdoor appreciation.

My skills in academic operational oversight have been finely honed, and I am confident my additional strengths will readily translate to your environment. The chance to offer more insight into my qualifications would be most welcome. Thank you for your consideration; I look forward to speaking with you soon.

Sincerely,

Douglas F. Blankenship

If you're looking for a new ed leadership job for the upcoming school year, now is the time to put together a cover letter that crushes it.

What do I mean by “it”? The competition. I hate to say it, but it's the truth.

Too many cover letters are milquetoast, run-of-the-mill statements of fact that do nothing—nothing—to get the applicant in the “yes” pile.

If you want to land your next admin job, you've got to ace the cover letter. (Read on for a free downloadable template)

The Cover Letter's Job

The cover letter's job is to get you into the “definitely interview” pile.

If your cover letter fails to do its job, the whole process stops. You're out of the running.

You can only write a solid cover letter if you understand its purpose. Your cover letter is NOT:

  • An explanation of the simple fact that you exist and are interested in the position
  • A narrative restatement of your résumé
  • A note to the reader that you possess the minimum legal requirements for the position

No, no, and no! Cover letters that only cover the basics don't give the reviewer any useful information. They fail to do their job…so you fail to get your job.

Don't Be Perfunctory—Sell Yourself

This is hard for us to do as educators, but in your cover letter, you've got to sell yourself as hard as you ever will.

This doesn't mean that you:

  • Brag or boast
  • Make unsupported claims
  • Explicitly say that you're the best person for the job

…but you need to make the reader come to the inevitable conclusion that you're the best person for the job.

I've read tons of cover letters that waste space with perfunctory, vague, and ultimately worthless niceties that fill the page, but don't help the reader fill the job.

Understand that you're actually doing the reader a favor by making a clear, strong case about yourself. Most of the time, reading cover letters is a total waste of time for the person reviewing applications, because they don't actually say anything enlightening about the applicant—and as a result, they all sound the same.

This is a mistake to avoid, but it's also a huge opportunity for you. Write a strong cover letter that sells your candidacy, and you'll stand out above the rest.

Don't Duplicate Your Résumé—Bring It To Life

The place to list your certifications, degrees, and years of experience is in the résumé. Your cover letter has a different job.

When it comes to qualifications, your cover letter should:

  • Connect the dots for the reader—always explain how the qualifications you're highlighting actually make a difference. For example, “My extensive experience working with teachers as an instructional coach has allowed me to develop both the expertise and the relationship-building skills that it takes to be a principal who is truly an instructional leader.”
  • NEVER mention minimum qualifications, e.g. “I have a beginning principal's certificate from XYZ university”. Nothing screams “rookie!” like a cover letter that brags about meeting the job's minimum requirements.
  • Frame your qualifications in terms of benefits for the organization, and especially for its students, e.g. “My passion for restorative justice compelled me to lead the development of a behavior intervention program that reduced out-of-school suspensions by 63%.”

In other words, don't just share facts that are in your résumé (and certainly don't share facts that don't make you stand out).

Tell a story. Put the picture together for the reader, so they see how qualified you really are, and what a good fit you'd be.

For another take on your cover letter, check out this episode of Principal Center TV:

Download My Ultimate Cover Letter Template

I've created a simple, one-page template for you to follow as you craft your competition-crushing cover letter.

It's not a fill-in-the-blank deal—in fact, you won't be using any of my words. But you'll have a paragraph-by-paragraph guide to what your letter should accomplish.

Download »

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