Edmonton Mill Creek Mla Bibliography

Newspaper – A daily or weekly publication that contains news; often featuring articles on political events, crime, business, art, entertainment, society, and sports. Only include [City] if it is not in the Newspaper’s title. Do not include if the paper is well known or nationally published.


 

How to cite a newspaper in print

Structure:

Last, First M. “Article Title.” Newspaper Title [City] Date Month Year Published: Page(s). Print.

 

Example:

Bowman, Lee. “Bills Target Lake Erie Mussels.” Pittsburgh Press 7 Mar. 1990: A4. Print.


How to cite a newspaper article found online

Note: URL is optional. Consult your teacher.

 

Structure:

Last, First M. “Article Title.” Newspaper Title Date Month Year Published: Page(s). Website Title. Web. Date Month Year Accessed.

Date Accessed: This is the date that you found and read the article. When did you access the source? Web sources may change and must be considered unique.

 

Example:

Bowman, Lee. “Bills Target Lake Erie Mussels.” Pittsburgh Press 7 Mar. 1990: A4. Google News. Web. 16 Mar. 2010.


Newspaper article found on a database

Structure:

Last, First M. “Article Title.” Newspaper Title[City] Date Month Year Published, Edition ed.: Database Name. Web. Date Month Year Accessed.

Date Accessed: This is the date that you found and read the article. When did you access the source? Web sources may change and must be considered unique.

 

Example:

Anand, Geeta. “Fire and Fumes Can’t Drive Indians from Hellish Village.” Wall Street Journal 2 Apr. 2010, Eastern ed.: A1. Proquest Newspapers. Web. 5 Apr. 2010.


Newspaper article published online

Note: CNN.com does not have a print publication of its content. They produce their content directly online.

 

Structure:

Last, First M. “Article Title.” Website Title. Website Publisher, Date Month Year Published. Web. Date Month Year Accessed.


Example:

Jensen, Elizabeth. “Sesame Workshop Tackles Literacy With Technology.” The New York Times. The New York Times Company, 19 Oct. 2014. Web. 20 Oct. 2014.


Newspaper content published directly or simultaneously online

Note: URL is optional. Consult your teacher.

 

Structure:

Last, First M. “Article Title.” Website Title. Website Publisher, Date Month Year Published. Web. Date Month Year Accessed.


Date Accessed: This is the date that you found and read the article. When did you access the source? Web sources may change and must be considered unique.

Online Newspaper or Website? Because we cannot identify separate in print publication information, we can assume this source was published either online only, or concurrently online and in print. We therefore do not need to account for standard newspaper publication information (such as page numbers), but instead, website information. This will help your reader identify the source.

Example:

Hernandez, Javier C. “Sharp Rise in Home Sales in February.” New York Times. New York Times, 5 Apr. 2010. Web. 7 Apr. 2010.


For the article on Edmonton's Mill Creek and Mill Creek Ravine, see Mill Creek Ravine.

Edmonton Mill Creek is a provincialelectoral district for the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, Canada.

History[edit]

The electoral district was created in the 1996 boundary redistribution from the old electoral district of Edmonton-Avonmore and a small part of Edmonton-Gold Bar. The 2010 boundary redistribution saw the riding boundaries shift southwards. The 2003 south boundaries which ended at 23 Avenue were moved further south into Edmonton-Mill Woods and Edmonton-Ellerslie to end at Anthony Henday Drive. The northern boundaries of the riding were also pushed south from 92 Avenue to the Sherwood Park Freeway at its most northern point.

Boundary history[edit]

37 Edmonton-Mill Creek 2003 Boundaries[1]
Bordering Districts
NorthEastWestSouth
Edmonton-Gold Bar, Edmonton-Strathcona and Sherwood ParkStrathconaEdmonton-StrathconaEdmonton-Ellerslie, Edmonton-Mill Woods and Edmonton-Rutherford
riding map goes here
Legal description from the Statutes of Alberta 2003, Electoral Divisions Act.
Starting at the intersection of Gateway Boulevard with Whyte Avenue (82 Avenue); then 1. east along Whyte Avenue (82 Avenue) to 75 Street; 2. north along 75 Street to 90 Avenue; 3. east along 90 Avenue to 50 Street; 4. north along 50 Street to 92 Avenue; 5. east along 92 Avenue to the east Edmonton city boundary; 6. south, east and south along the east city boundary to 23 Avenue; 7. west along 23 Avenue to Mill Creek; 8. in a northwesterly direction along Mill Creek to 50 Street; 9. north along 50 Street to Whitemud Drive; 10. west along Whitemud Drive to Gateway Boulevard; 11. north along Gateway Boulevard to the starting point.
Note:

Electoral history[edit]

The electoral district was created in 1997 largely from the old electoral district of Edmonton-Avonmore. That district had become a swing riding through the 1980s and 90s being won by candidates from three different parties. The incumbent Gene Zwozdesky had previously represented Avonmore winning his first term in office in 1993.

Zwozdesky won his first term representing Mill Creek as a Liberal candidate. A year later in 1998 he had a high profile falling out with the Liberal party and left the caucus to sit as an Independent. He joined the Progressive Conservative caucus a short time later and was re-elected under that banner in 2001.

Starting in 1999 Zwozdesky was appointed to his first portfolio as a junior minister. In total he has held six different ministerial portfolios in the governments of Ralph Klein and Ed Stelmach with his last portfolio ending in 2011.

Legislature results[edit]

1997 general election[edit]

2001 general election[edit]

2004 general election[edit]

2008 general election[edit]

Alberta general election, 2008
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Progressive ConservativeGene Zwozdesky6,85750.79%8.71%
LiberalAman Gill4,05830.05%-5.55%
New DemocraticStephen Anderson1,82213.49%-0.69%
GreenGlen Argan7265.37%2.17%
CommunistNaomi Rankin410.30%
Total13,504
Rejected, spoiled and declined127
Eligible electors / Turnout32,55341.87%
Progressive ConservativeholdSwing7.13%
Source: The Report on the March 3, 2008 Provincial General Election of the Twenty-seventh Legislative Assembly. Elections Alberta. July 28, 2008. pp. 320–323. 

2012 general election[edit]

2015 general election[edit]

Senate nominee results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election results: Edmonton-Mill Creek[2]Turnout 49.67%
AffiliationCandidateVotes% Votes% BallotsRank
Progressive ConservativeBetty Unger4,22315.38%46.08%2
 IndependentLink Byfield3,42312.47%37.35%4
Progressive ConservativeBert Brown3,06511.17%33.44%1
Progressive ConservativeCliff Breitkreuz3,03011.04%33.06%3
 IndependentTom Sindlinger2,5409.25%27.71%9
Alberta AllianceMichael Roth2,5009.11%27.28%7
Progressive ConservativeDavid Usherwood2,3808.67%25.97%6
Alberta AllianceGary Horan2,2168.07%24.18%10
Alberta AllianceVance Gough2,2128.06%24.14%8
Progressive ConservativeJim Silye1,8616.78%20.31%5
Total Votes27,450100%
Total Ballots9,1653.00 Votes Per Ballot
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined2,965

Voters had the option of selecting 4 Candidates on the Ballot

2012 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

Student Vote results[edit]

2004 election[edit]

Participating Schools[3]
J. H. Picard School
W. P. Wagner School

On November 19, 2004, a Student Vote was conducted at participating Alberta schools to parallel the 2004 Alberta general election results. The vote was designed to educate students and simulate the electoral process for persons who have not yet reached the legal majority. The vote was conducted in 80 of the 83 provincial electoral districts with students voting for actual election candidates. Schools with a large student body that reside in another electoral district had the option to vote for candidates outside of the electoral district then where they were physically located.

2012 election[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

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